Catherine Mabee

F, #1321, b. circa 1775, d. before 14 February 1835
FatherJeremiah Francis Mabee b. bt 1738 - 1739, d. 13 Apr 1824
MotherJudith Chedeayne b. 20 Dec 1745
Info* Information on her came from Robert Mutrie # 23 to early Maybee Society records. 
Married Name Her married name was Drake. 
(Witness) Anecdote1 March 1903 For the benefit of my relatives on my father's side, who are not acquainted with the origin of our forefathers, have thought best to jot down a few facts known only to myself. Our Mabee ancestors were English, of Puritan stock, and during the reign of Charles the Second (known in English history as the period of Restoration) they, with many others fled to Holland to escape persecution from the established church, and remained in that country till again persecuted for their religious beliefs. They then, with a number of Hollanders, sought refuge in America settling on the cite [sic] of the present city of New York, to which they gave the name New Amsterdam. They lived there in peace under the flag of Old England till the time of the American Revolution in 1776, when a goodly number, rather than take arms against the mother country, sacrificed all they gained in the New World, their homes as well, and came to Canada, a number settling at the mouth of the St. John river, New Brunswick, the site of the city of St. John, landing there May 18, 1783. This date was once kept as a public holiday, known as Loyalist Day or Landing of the Loyalists. Among this number was my great grandfather, Jeremiah Mabee, his wife (a Miss Chadyne of a French Huguenot family) his three sons, Jeremiah (my grandfather), William and Gilbert and his daughter Catherine, who afterward married Jeremiah Drake of St. John. The old gentleman, after a time, settled on a tract of land between the Bellisle and Kennebacasis rivers in the Parish of Kingston, Kings County, upon which he lived until he decease (time unknown).
He willed part of his estate to his eldest son, Jeremiah, who lived upon his part of the property till his death June 21, 1863, being at the time 83 years 6 months and 21 days old. William lived on his part of his father's estate for a time and in 1837 removed to Upper Canada (now Ontario). The thirs son, Gilbert, was drowned at Grand Bay but have never learned the particulars.
Jeremiah had a family of fourteen children, seven sons in succession and following seven daughters, whose names are as follows: Barnabas F; Gilbert G; Abram D; Ginge H. [George]; Jeremiah D; Simon; and William S; the daughters names were: Maria; Hannah; Caroline; Catherine; Matilda; Lucenda and Harriett. The maiden name of the mother of this large family was Susanna Downey, also of Loyalist ancestry. There are a large number of people by the name Mabee or Mabie, both in Canada and the United Ststes, all without doubt deriving their descent from the same stock, but to trace the relationship would be a useless and thankless task.
I, Albert A. Mabee, eldest son of William S. Mabee and Margaret F. Northrup (also of Loyalist descent) was born at Kingston, Sept. 26, 1843. There were twelve in the family, six sons and six daughters. The sons were: Albert A; Horatio N; Ira W; Herbert G; Wilfred A. J; and Clarence A. The daughters were: Mary Susanna; Harriett Lucinda; Emma Sarah; Ada Caroline and Ida Augusta (twins); Frances Ella
/s/ Albert A. Mabee, March 1, 1903.1 
Birth*circa 1775 Catherine Mabee was born circa 1775 at Westchester County, New York.2 
(Witness) ImmigrationOctober 1783 She immigrated with Jeremiah Francis Mabee and Judith Chedeayne in October 1783 at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.Jeremiah Mabee, his wife and 3 children, from Westchester County, were passengers on the "Mercury" arriving in Saint John with the October fleet in 1783.3 
Marriage* Catherine Mabee married Jeremiah Drake.4 
Anecdote*15 August 1820 Catherine Drake, 45, Female, occupation - Lady, traveled on the ship Charlotte Corday, from St John, New Brunswick, and arrived in the Port of New York on 15 Aug 1820.2 
(Witness) Will15 March 1824 Catherine Mabee was mentioned in the will of Jeremiah Francis Mabee on 15 March 1824 at Kingston, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada. "Jeremiah Mabee, Sr., of Parish of Kingston, Kings Co., Yeoman. Will dated 3/16/1824, proved 7/8/1824. Names sons Jeremiah, William, daughter Catherine, wife of Jeremiah Drake, Judith Drake, daughter of Catherine & Jeremiah."5 
Death*before 14 February 1835 Catherine Mabee died before 14 February 1835; Catherine Drake, consort of Jeremiah Drake whose death was announced in papers of last week was a daughter of Jeremiah Mabee of Kingston, Kings County. She emigrated to this province with her parents in 1783.6 

Family

Jeremiah Drake b. c 1766, d. 4 Apr 1846
Child

Citations

  1. [S206] Email sent to John MayBee the MayBee Society database coordinator:from Jane Gehring, e-mail address, 21 Aug 2016. Letter by Albert A. Mabee, March 1, 1903. Typed on the reversed business stationary of his brother, William I. Mabie & Son, Constructing Engineers, 73 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass.
  2. [S1] Ancestry.com, New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 for Catherine Drake, M237, 1820-1897, Roll 001.
  3. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  4. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, father's will, death notice.
  5. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, Early New Brunswick Probate Records 1785 – 1835, by R. Wallace Hale.
  6. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, N.B. Courier, Saint John, St. John County.
  7. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, father's will.

Gilbert Mabee

M, #1322, b. before 1772, d. circa 1796
FatherJeremiah Francis Mabee b. bt 1738 - 1739, d. 13 Apr 1824
MotherJudith Chedeayne b. 20 Dec 1745
Birth*before 1772 Gilbert Mabee was born before 1772 at Westchester County, New York. 
(Witness) ImmigrationOctober 1783 He immigrated with Jeremiah Francis Mabee and Judith Chedeayne in October 1783 at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.Jeremiah Mabee, his wife and 3 children, from Westchester County, were passengers on the "Mercury" arriving in Saint John with the October fleet in 1783.1 
Land*21 February 1785  On 21 February 1785 Gilbert Mabee and John Chedeayne Petition of John Chadeayne and Gilbert Mabee stating "that they are Loyal Refugees from West Chester Province of New York, have been and now are without any lands". Requested a particular lot that was apparently not granted.2 
Memo*3 March 1786 Gilbert Mabee and Jeremiah Francis Mabee Jeremiah Mabee and Gilbert Mabee, from Westchester County, signed a petition at Saint John on 3/3/1786. on 3 March 1786 at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.1 
Land*circa 1790  Circa 1790 at Lot 16, Kingston, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada, Gilbert Mabee Lot #16 in Kingston was registered to his son, Gilbert Mabee, who drowned leaving no heirs and requesting that the lot be confirmed to Gilbert's younger brother William Mabee.
Source: PANB, microfilm F1040.3 
Memo1794 He and Jeremiah Francis Mabee Undated petition of Jeremiah Mabee, Gilbert Mabee , Justus Sherwood, Jacob Drake and Edward Webster of Kings County, New Brunswick, "desirous of settling on the New Road from the head of Belisle Bay to the Washademoic" requesting 2500 acres. file says "no date, supposed in 1794" in 1794 at Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.4 
Death*circa 1796 Gilbert Mabee died circa 1796 at Grand Bay, Saint John County, New Brunswick, Canada; drowned.3 
(Witness) Memo26 February 1796 He witnessed Jeremiah Francis Mabee Petition by Jeremiah Mabee of Kings County stating that Lot #16 in Kingston was registered to his son, Gilbert Mabee, who drowned leaving no heirs and requesting that the lot be confirmed to Gilbert's younger brother William Mabee. on 26 February 1796 at Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.5 

Citations

  1. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  2. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, PANB, microfilm F.
  3. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, Petition by father. Source: PANB, microfilm F1040.
  4. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, PANB, microfilm F1039.
  5. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, PANB, microfilm F1040.

William Mabee

M, #1323, b. 12 June 1789, d. 21 June 1877
FatherJeremiah Francis Mabee b. bt 1738 - 1739, d. 13 Apr 1824
MotherJudith Chedeayne b. 20 Dec 1745
(Witness) Anecdote1 March 1903 For the benefit of my relatives on my father's side, who are not acquainted with the origin of our forefathers, have thought best to jot down a few facts known only to myself. Our Mabee ancestors were English, of Puritan stock, and during the reign of Charles the Second (known in English history as the period of Restoration) they, with many others fled to Holland to escape persecution from the established church, and remained in that country till again persecuted for their religious beliefs. They then, with a number of Hollanders, sought refuge in America settling on the cite [sic] of the present city of New York, to which they gave the name New Amsterdam. They lived there in peace under the flag of Old England till the time of the American Revolution in 1776, when a goodly number, rather than take arms against the mother country, sacrificed all they gained in the New World, their homes as well, and came to Canada, a number settling at the mouth of the St. John river, New Brunswick, the site of the city of St. John, landing there May 18, 1783. This date was once kept as a public holiday, known as Loyalist Day or Landing of the Loyalists. Among this number was my great grandfather, Jeremiah Mabee, his wife (a Miss Chadyne of a French Huguenot family) his three sons, Jeremiah (my grandfather), William and Gilbert and his daughter Catherine, who afterward married Jeremiah Drake of St. John. The old gentleman, after a time, settled on a tract of land between the Bellisle and Kennebacasis rivers in the Parish of Kingston, Kings County, upon which he lived until he decease (time unknown).
He willed part of his estate to his eldest son, Jeremiah, who lived upon his part of the property till his death June 21, 1863, being at the time 83 years 6 months and 21 days old. William lived on his part of his father's estate for a time and in 1837 removed to Upper Canada (now Ontario). The thirs son, Gilbert, was drowned at Grand Bay but have never learned the particulars.
Jeremiah had a family of fourteen children, seven sons in succession and following seven daughters, whose names are as follows: Barnabas F; Gilbert G; Abram D; Ginge H. [George]; Jeremiah D; Simon; and William S; the daughters names were: Maria; Hannah; Caroline; Catherine; Matilda; Lucenda and Harriett. The maiden name of the mother of this large family was Susanna Downey, also of Loyalist ancestry. There are a large number of people by the name Mabee or Mabie, both in Canada and the United Ststes, all without doubt deriving their descent from the same stock, but to trace the relationship would be a useless and thankless task.
I, Albert A. Mabee, eldest son of William S. Mabee and Margaret F. Northrup (also of Loyalist descent) was born at Kingston, Sept. 26, 1843. There were twelve in the family, six sons and six daughters. The sons were: Albert A; Horatio N; Ira W; Herbert G; Wilfred A. J; and Clarence A. The daughters were: Mary Susanna; Harriett Lucinda; Emma Sarah; Ada Caroline and Ida Augusta (twins); Frances Ella
/s/ Albert A. Mabee, March 1, 1903.1 
Birth*12 June 1789 William Mabee was born on 12 June 1789 at Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.2 
(Witness) Memo26 February 1796 He witnessed Jeremiah Francis Mabee Petition by Jeremiah Mabee of Kings County stating that Lot #16 in Kingston was registered to his son, Gilbert Mabee, who drowned leaving no heirs and requesting that the lot be confirmed to Gilbert's younger brother William Mabee. on 26 February 1796 at Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.3 
Marriage* William Mabee married Mary Downey.4,5 
(Witness) Anecdotebetween 1824 and 1831 Entries from Journal of the House of Assembly of the province of New-Brunswick, show the progress of a road from Jeremiah's farm to Kennebecasis
Jan-Mar 1824 - Kings Co., The sum of 25 pounds for the road from near Mabee's to the Kennebecasis
26th February 1825 Item No. 32 is Jeremiah Mabee's account with affidavit and vouchers, for the expenditure of 35 pounds on the Road leading from Mabee's to the Kenebeccasis. he credits no Money from the Province Treasurery. Page 49, 68, 81
Feb-Apr 1828- Mr. Humbert, by leave, presented a Petition from William Mabee, and others, inhabitants of Kings County, Praying aid to assist in completing the road leading from Mabee's Farm (middle land) to the Kennebeckacis River.
Feb-Mar 1831- Resolved: Than No. 19, the account of Jeremiah Maybee, for the expenditure of 20 pounds on the road leading from Maybees farm, to Kennebeckasis, Kings Co., is unsatisfactory, the said commissioner having performed the work himself, at 4s. 9d. per rod, alleging that he was the lowest bidder at Action for the same, a circumstance which the House cannot allow.
Jan-Mar 1832 - Grant, 1830 Jeremiah Maybee; - has produced vouchers and given the necessary explanations as required by the House last Session; and his account is now satisfactory.6 
(Witness) Will15 March 1824 William Mabee was mentioned in the will of Jeremiah Francis Mabee on 15 March 1824 at Kingston, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada. "Jeremiah Mabee, Sr., of Parish of Kingston, Kings Co., Yeoman. Will dated 3/16/1824, proved 7/8/1824. Names sons Jeremiah, William, daughter Catherine, wife of Jeremiah Drake, Judith Drake, daughter of Catherine & Jeremiah."7 
Land16 March 1824  On 16 March 1824 William Mabee He inherited his father's farm by his will dated 16 Mar 182?2,4 
Residence*between 1835 and 1836 He lived between 1835 and 1836 at Windham Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada; moved to Windham Township, Norfolk County, sometime after his father's death in 1824.8 
Census*1851 William Mabee and Mary Downey appeared on the census of 1851 at Windham Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.
37, Wm Mabee, M, 63, M, Farmer, New Brunswick, Baptist
38, Mary Mabee, F, 61, M, New Brunswick, Baptist
39, Chas H. Mabee, M, 20, S, New Brunswick, Laborer, Baptist
40, James A. Mabee, M, 18, S, New Brunswick, Laborer, Baptist
41, Sarah Mabee, F, 15, M [!], Upper Canada, Baptist.9 
Census*1861 William Mabee and Mary Downey appeared on the census of 1861 at Windham Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.
2, William Mabee, M, 72, M, New Brunswick, Baptist, Farmer
3, Mary Mabee, F, 70, M, New Brunswick, Baptist
4, James A. Mabee, M, 27, S, New Brunswick, Baptist, Laborer
5, Sarah Mabee, F, 24, S, Canada West, Baptist
6, Albert Johnston, M, 11, S, Canada West, Baptist, Non Family
Resides in a one story log house.10 
(Witness) Census1871 William Mabee appeared on the census of 1871 in the household of James Alfred Slocum Mabee and Rebecca Elisabeth Dunlop at Windham, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada,
; 16, James Mabee, M, 36, M, Ontario, Baptist, Dutch, Farmer
17, Rebecca Mabee, F, 34, M, Ontario, Baptist, Dutch
18, William Mabee, M, 5, Ontario, Baptist, Dutch
19, Giddis Mabee, M, 2, Ontario, Baptist, Dutch
20, William Mabee, M, 81, Ontario, Baptist, origen has N.B.[lined out] unknown, Farmer
Residing Lot 9, Concession 6, 150 acres, 1 house, 1 barn, 2 carriages, 3 wagon, 4 ploughs, 1 horse rake, 4 horses, 2 oxen, 4 cows, 6 other horned cattle, 1 sheep, 4 swine, wheat, oats, corn, potatoes.11 
Death*21 June 1877 William Mabee died on 21 June 1877 at Windham Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, at age 88.12 

Family

Mary Downey b. 1791
Children

Citations

  1. [S206] Email sent to John MayBee the MayBee Society database coordinator:from Jane Gehring, e-mail address, 21 Aug 2016. Letter by Albert A. Mabee, March 1, 1903. Typed on the reversed business stationary of his brother, William I. Mabie & Son, Constructing Engineers, 73 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass.
  2. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.
  3. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, PANB, microfilm F1040.
  4. [S150] Submission by Lori Jean Dubois, Maybee Society Member No. 287.
  5. [S153] Norfolk County Genealogy Website, online http://www.norfolkgenealogy.com/, 1852 census, page 23.
  6. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, "Journals of the House of Assembly of the province of New-Brunswick" Colonial Government Journals - Fredericton CIHM - ID: 9_00951_32, 36, 40, and 41.
  7. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, Early New Brunswick Probate Records 1785 – 1835, by R. Wallace Hale.
  8. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  9. [S416] 1851 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Windham Township, Norfolk County, Canada West, ED 4, Page 77.
  10. [S415] 1861 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Windham Township, Norfolk, Upper Canada, ED 1, Page 11.
  11. [S417] 1871 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com and http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~smabie/…, Windham Township, Norfolk North, Ontario, ED 2,Page 18, Family 76.
  12. [S1] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938.
  13. [S13] Handbook of compiled genealogical records, p 150.
  14. [S12] Steve Mabie's Canadian census, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canadaindex.htm, 1851 census.

Jeremiah D. Mabee

M, #1324, b. 1 January 1780, d. 21 June 1863
FatherJeremiah Francis Mabee b. bt 1738 - 1739, d. 13 Apr 1824
MotherJudith Chedeayne b. 20 Dec 1745
Info* Information on him came from Records of Dutch Reformed Church according to Robert Mutrie. to early Maybee Society records. 
Info Information on him came from DuBois file 7fm2f3 to early Maybee Society records.1 
Name Variation  Jeremiah D. Mabee was also known as Captain.2 
(Witness) Anecdote1 March 1903 For the benefit of my relatives on my father's side, who are not acquainted with the origin of our forefathers, have thought best to jot down a few facts known only to myself. Our Mabee ancestors were English, of Puritan stock, and during the reign of Charles the Second (known in English history as the period of Restoration) they, with many others fled to Holland to escape persecution from the established church, and remained in that country till again persecuted for their religious beliefs. They then, with a number of Hollanders, sought refuge in America settling on the cite [sic] of the present city of New York, to which they gave the name New Amsterdam. They lived there in peace under the flag of Old England till the time of the American Revolution in 1776, when a goodly number, rather than take arms against the mother country, sacrificed all they gained in the New World, their homes as well, and came to Canada, a number settling at the mouth of the St. John river, New Brunswick, the site of the city of St. John, landing there May 18, 1783. This date was once kept as a public holiday, known as Loyalist Day or Landing of the Loyalists. Among this number was my great grandfather, Jeremiah Mabee, his wife (a Miss Chadyne of a French Huguenot family) his three sons, Jeremiah (my grandfather), William and Gilbert and his daughter Catherine, who afterward married Jeremiah Drake of St. John. The old gentleman, after a time, settled on a tract of land between the Bellisle and Kennebacasis rivers in the Parish of Kingston, Kings County, upon which he lived until he decease (time unknown).
He willed part of his estate to his eldest son, Jeremiah, who lived upon his part of the property till his death June 21, 1863, being at the time 83 years 6 months and 21 days old. William lived on his part of his father's estate for a time and in 1837 removed to Upper Canada (now Ontario). The thirs son, Gilbert, was drowned at Grand Bay but have never learned the particulars.
Jeremiah had a family of fourteen children, seven sons in succession and following seven daughters, whose names are as follows: Barnabas F; Gilbert G; Abram D; Ginge H. [George]; Jeremiah D; Simon; and William S; the daughters names were: Maria; Hannah; Caroline; Catherine; Matilda; Lucenda and Harriett. The maiden name of the mother of this large family was Susanna Downey, also of Loyalist ancestry. There are a large number of people by the name Mabee or Mabie, both in Canada and the United Ststes, all without doubt deriving their descent from the same stock, but to trace the relationship would be a useless and thankless task.
I, Albert A. Mabee, eldest son of William S. Mabee and Margaret F. Northrup (also of Loyalist descent) was born at Kingston, Sept. 26, 1843. There were twelve in the family, six sons and six daughters. The sons were: Albert A; Horatio N; Ira W; Herbert G; Wilfred A. J; and Clarence A. The daughters were: Mary Susanna; Harriett Lucinda; Emma Sarah; Ada Caroline and Ida Augusta (twins); Frances Ella
/s/ Albert A. Mabee, March 1, 1903.3 
Birth*1 January 1780 He was born on 1 January 1780 at Long Island, New York. 
(Witness) ImmigrationOctober 1783 He immigrated with Jeremiah Francis Mabee and Judith Chedeayne in October 1783 at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.Jeremiah Mabee, his wife and 3 children, from Westchester County, were passengers on the "Mercury" arriving in Saint John with the October fleet in 1783.4 
Marriage* Jeremiah D. Mabee married Susanna Downey, daughter of Abraham Downey and Mary Clover.1 
Anecdote*between 1824 and 1831 Entries from Journal of the House of Assembly of the province of New-Brunswick, show the progress of a road from Jeremiah's farm to Kennebecasis
Jan-Mar 1824 - Kings Co., The sum of 25 pounds for the road from near Mabee's to the Kennebecasis
26th February 1825 Item No. 32 is Jeremiah Mabee's account with affidavit and vouchers, for the expenditure of 35 pounds on the Road leading from Mabee's to the Kenebeccasis. he credits no Money from the Province Treasurery. Page 49, 68, 81
Feb-Apr 1828- Mr. Humbert, by leave, presented a Petition from William Mabee, and others, inhabitants of Kings County, Praying aid to assist in completing the road leading from Mabee's Farm (middle land) to the Kennebeckacis River.
Feb-Mar 1831- Resolved: Than No. 19, the account of Jeremiah Maybee, for the expenditure of 20 pounds on the road leading from Maybees farm, to Kennebeckasis, Kings Co., is unsatisfactory, the said commissioner having performed the work himself, at 4s. 9d. per rod, alleging that he was the lowest bidder at Action for the same, a circumstance which the House cannot allow.
Jan-Mar 1832 - Grant, 1830 Jeremiah Maybee; - has produced vouchers and given the necessary explanations as required by the House last Session; and his account is now satisfactory.5 
(Witness) Will15 March 1824 Jeremiah D. Mabee was mentioned in the will of Jeremiah Francis Mabee on 15 March 1824 at Kingston, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada. "Jeremiah Mabee, Sr., of Parish of Kingston, Kings Co., Yeoman. Will dated 3/16/1824, proved 7/8/1824. Names sons Jeremiah, William, daughter Catherine, wife of Jeremiah Drake, Judith Drake, daughter of Catherine & Jeremiah."6 
(Witness) Death1 April 1840 Jeremiah D. Mabee was made a widower by the death of Susanna Downey on 1 April 1840 at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada; Died, on April 1st, at her son's residence in St. John, Susannah Mabee, wife of Jeremiah Mabee, Kingston, Kings Co., age 55, left husband.7 
Marriage*18 May 1842 Jeremiah D. Mabee married Mary Pickett on 18 May 1842 at Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.
"Jeremiah Mabee, Parish of Kingston, and Mary Pickett, witnesses: Abraham Pickett, Jane Wheten."8 
(Witness) Marriage24 December 1844 Jeremiah D. Mabee witnessed the marriage of Abraham Downey Mabee and Rhoda Humphrey on 24 December 1844 at Greenwich, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada; Married by Rev. James Cookson, Abraham D. Mabee, Parish of Kingston, and Ann Humphrey, Parish of Greenwich, youngest daughter of John Humphrey, witnesses: Jeremiah Mabee, Abel Humphrey.9 
Census*1851 Jeremiah D. Mabee and Mary Pickett appeared on the census of 1851 at Kingston Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.
Jeremiah Mabee, M, Head, 71, British, Farmer, prop, Nov 1783
Mary Mabee, F, Wife, 62, British, birth [born N.B.]
in same house
William S. Mabee, M, Head, 37, British, Tenant Farmer, birth [born N.B.]
Fanny Mabee, F, W, 26, British, birth [born N.B.]
Albert Mabee, M, Son, 7, British, birth [born N.B.]
Mary Mabee, F, Daughter, 5, British, birth [born N.B.]
Horatio Mabee, M, Son, 3, British, birth [born N.B.]
Lucinda Mabee, F, Daughter, 1, British, birth [born N.B.]
Mary O'Connor, F, Servant, 19, Irish, birth [born N.B.].10 
Census1861 Jeremiah D. Mabee and Mary Pickett appeared on the census of 1861 at Kingston Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.
J D Mabee, M, 82, N.B., Farmer, Baptist
Mary Mabee, F, Wife, 71, F, Wife, N.B., Episcopalian.11 
Death*21 June 1863 Jeremiah D. Mabee died on 21 June 1863 at Kingston, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada, at age 83; Died, in Kingston, Kings Co., Sunday 21st June, Jeremiah Mabee , age 84. He was born on Long Island, State of New York in 1779 and came to Saint John with the Loyalists in 1783, left widow, ten children, 58 grandchildren, several great grand children.12 
Burial* He was buried at Erb's Cove Baptist Church Cemetery, New Brunswick, Canada. Inscription "In Memory of /Jeremiah D. Mabee /Died /9th Oct. 1870. /Beloved In Life. /Lamented in Death."13 
Probate1863 His estate was probated in 1863 at Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada.14 
Anecdote Jeremiah Mabee, son of Jeremiah, Sr., and Judith (Chadyne) Mabee, born on Long Island, N.Y., January 1, 1780, came to New Brunswick with his parents and his brother William on May 18, 1783. William Mabee subsequently settled in Kingston, Ont. He reared a large family. Jeremiah Mabee was both a farmer and a mechanic. He constructed the first spinning wheel made in Kingston, Kings County, N. B., where he resided until his death, which occurred in his eighty-fifth year. He was well known in that locality in his day, and for many years served as crier of the court. He married for his first wife Susana Downey, who became the mother of seven sons and seven daughters. For his second wife he married a Mrs. Pickett.15 

Family 1

Susanna Downey b. 5 Apr 1785, d. 1 Apr 1840
Children

Family 2

Mary Pickett b. bt 1789 - 1790, d. 14 Apr 1877

Citations

  1. [S150] Submission by Lori Jean Dubois, Maybee Society Member No. 287.
  2. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, daugher Caroline's marriage.
  3. [S206] Email sent to John MayBee the MayBee Society database coordinator:from Jane Gehring, e-mail address, 21 Aug 2016. Letter by Albert A. Mabee, March 1, 1903. Typed on the reversed business stationary of his brother, William I. Mabie & Son, Constructing Engineers, 73 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass.
  4. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  5. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, "Journals of the House of Assembly of the province of New-Brunswick" Colonial Government Journals - Fredericton CIHM - ID: 9_00951_32, 36, 40, and 41.
  6. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, Early New Brunswick Probate Records 1785 – 1835, by R. Wallace Hale.
  7. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, N.B. Courier, Saint John, St. John County Publication Date: 4/11/1840.
  8. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, Kings Co. Marriages, Register A, 1812-1844.
  9. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, N.B. Courier, Saint John, St. John County Publication Date: 1/11/184; and Kings Co. Marriages, Register B, 1844-1867.
  10. [S416] 1851 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Kingston, Kings County, New Brunswick, sheet 11.
  11. [S415] 1861 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Kingston, Kings, New Brunswick, sheet 50.
  12. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, N.B. Courier, Saint John, St. John County Publication Date: 6/27/1863.
  13. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, Erb's Cove Baptist Church Cemetery records. 99 Mabee, Broken, flat.
  14. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, Kings Co., New Brunswick Probate Index.
  15. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, "Biographical review : this volume contains biographical sketches of leading citizens of the province of New Brunswick"; Boston Biographical Review Publishing Company, 15 Court Square, 1900.

Judith Chedeayne

F, #1325, b. 20 December 1745
FatherDaniel Chedeayne b. 16 Jan 1719/20, d. 25 Oct 1809
MotherMarie Elizabeth Secord b. c 1712
Info* Information on her came from Jean Lintner, #34, Records of Dutch Reformed Church according to Robert Mutrie, DuBois file 8fm2f3m to early Maybee Society records. 
Married Name Her married name was Mabee. 
Birth*20 December 1745 Judith Chedeayne was born on 20 December 1745 at Just Mere Farm, Westchester County, New York.1,2 
Baptism16 February 1746 She was baptized on 16 February 1746 at French Church, New Rochelle, Westchester County, New York.2 
Marriage* She married Jeremiah Francis Mabee, son of Simon Mabee and Marie Landrin.
"According to Jean Lintner, #34, Jeremiah and wife Judith were cousins." 
Immigration*October 1783  In October 1783 Judith Chedeayne and Jeremiah Francis Mabee immigrated with Gilbert Mabee, Jeremiah D. Mabee and Catherine Mabee to Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.Jeremiah Mabee, his wife and 3 children, from Westchester County, were passengers on the "Mercury" arriving in Saint John with the October fleet in 1783.3 
(Witness) Will15 June 1801 Judith Chedeayne was mentioned in the will of Daniel Chedeayne on 15 June 1801 at Yorktown, Westchester County, New York. "Will of Daniel Chadeayne, of Yorktown, Westchester County, NY, dated 6/15/1801, proved 5/19/1810, mentions daughter Jude, the wife of Jeremiah Mabee."4 

Family

Jeremiah Francis Mabee b. bt 1738 - 1739, d. 13 Apr 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees, Mabee Family Tree (Owner: R_Mabee).
  2. [S1] Ancestry.com, U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-1989.
  3. [S14] Steve Mabie, Chronology of NB and Maine, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  4. [S19] Steve's Chronology, Caspar, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/caspar/caspar.htm

Pelham Mabee

M, #1326, b. 19 January 1787, d. 7 February 1861
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Name Variation  Pelham Mabee was also known as Pellum. 
Birth*19 January 1787 He was born on 19 January 1787 at New Brunswick, Canada.2 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.3 
(Witness) Immigration1793 He immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.4 
Marriage* Pelham Mabee married Mary Layman
MilService*1812  In 1812 at Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, Pelham Mabee was in the military, Served in the War of 1812 for Canada, Pelham Mabee, 2nd Flank Company, 1st Regiment, Norfolk Militia.5 
(Witness) Will3 April 1823 He was mentioned in the will of Lavinia Pelham on 3 April 1823 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. "Will of Levinah Hilton, of Charlottesville, dated 3/4/1823, mentions sons Pellum Mabee, Oliver Mabee, son-in-law John Stone, grandson William Stone, Gabriel Mabee, and other sons and daughters, but not identified."6 
Census1851 Pelham Mabee and Mary Layman appeared on the census of 1851 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.
10, Pelham Mabee, M, 65, M, New Brunswick, Methodist
11, Mary Mabee, F, 61, M, United States, Baptist
12, Drusilla Mabee, F, 32, S, Canada, nothing
13, Elizabeth Crocket, F, 19, M, Canada, Baptist, baby girl born and died at 2 days in 1851
14, Susan Mabee, F, 3, S, Canada, Baptist
15, Mary Ann Mabee, F, 6, S, Canada, Baptist
16, Jacob Barnhart, M, 53, W, Labourer, Canada, Christian, not family member
Resided in a one story frame house
19, Pelham Mabee , Range A, Lot 10, no land or crops described.7 
(Witness) Census1861 Pelham Mabee appeared on the census of 1861 in the household of George Mabee at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada,
; 30, George Maybee, M, 43, S, Upper Canada, Baptist, Farmer
31, Pelm Maybee, M, 33, M, Upper Canada, Baptist
32, Sarah Maybee, F, 25, S, USA, Baptist
33, Josephine Maybee, F, 7, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
34, Francis Maybee, M!, 5, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
35, Oscar Maybee, M, 3, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
36, Pelm Maybee, M, 74, M, New Brunswick, Baptist
37, Mary Maybee, F, 70, M, USA, Baptist
38, Drusilla Maybee, F, 40, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
39, Fred'k Maybee, M, 38, M, Upper Canada, Baptist
40, Margt Maybee, F, 28, M, Scotland, Baptist
41, Isabella Maybee, F, 6, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
42, Walter Maybee, M, 5, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
43, Peter Maybee, M, 3, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
44, Mary Maybee, F, 14, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
45, Susan Maybee, F, 12, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
46, Jas Maybee, M, 9, S, Upper Canada, Baptist
Agricultural Census
18, George Maybee , Con 1, Lot 9, total acreage 33, 33 under cultivation, 30 under crops in 1860 and 3 under orchards or garden. Farm valued at $1600, Farming equipment valued at $100
19, Pelm Maybee Jr , Con 1, Lot 10, total acreage 75, 61 under cultivation, 50 under crops in 1860, 8 under pasture in 1860, 3 under orchards or garden, and 14 under woods or wild. Farm valued at $2500, Farming equipment valued at --.8 
Death*7 February 1861 Pelham Mabee died on 7 February 1861 at Turkey Point, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, at age 74.9 

Family

Mary Layman b. bt 1790 - 1791, d. 10 Apr 1868
Children

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, e-mail address.
  3. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  4. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  5. [S66] Submission by Steve Mabie, Maybee Society Member No. 257., Index of Land Claim Certificates of Upper Canada Militiamen who served in the War of 1812, listed under Upper Canada, land grants, certificates of service, pension record, etc. Old reference # RG-9-I-A-4, New Reference #R1023-17-4-E (pages 14-15 File #53).
  6. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  7. [S416] 1851 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Canada West, ED 5, Page 11 and Agricultural Schedule, Page 127.
  8. [S415] 1861 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk, Upper Canada, ED 2, Page 46 and Agricultural Census, Township of Charlotteville, ED 1, page 27.
  9. [S357] Submission by Joseph Louis de Beauchamp, Maybee Society Member No. 363.

Frederick Mabee Jr

M, #1327, b. 1781, d. between 1884 and 1891
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Birth*1781 Frederick Mabee Jr was born in 1781 at New York, Probably died young.2 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Frederick Mabee Jr appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.3 
Death*between 1884 and 1891 Frederick Mabee Jr died between 1884 and 1891 at Canada. 

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.
  3. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."

Sarah Mabee

F, #1328, b. 1 January 1779, d. 11 December 1818
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Name Variation  Sarah Mabee was also known as Sally.2 
Married Name Her married name was Montross. 
Birth*1 January 1779 She was born on 1 January 1779 at Fishkill, Dutchess County, New York.3,4 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Sarah Mabee appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.5 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.6 
(Witness) Immigration1793 Sarah Mabee immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.7 
Marriage*23 March 1799 Sarah Mabee married Silas Montross, son of Peter Montross and Leah Mabee, on 23 March 1799 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.8 
Death*11 December 1818 Sarah Mabee died on 11 December 1818 at age 39.9 

Family

Silas Montross b. 20 Jun 1772, d. 15 Nov 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S11] Data from the Maybee Society Card File, R. Robert Mutrie. "The Long Point Settlers" 1992.
  3. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.
  4. [S399] Submission by Maybee Society Member Marion G. Turk, #32 gives birth place as Massachusetts.
  5. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  6. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  7. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  8. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, According to William D. Reid in Loyalists in Ontario.
  9. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.
  10. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, from http://my.tbaytel.net/bmartin/

Mary Mabie

F, #1329, b. 27 September 1771, d. circa April 1845
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Name Variation  Mary Mabie was also known as Polly. 
Married Name Her married name was Secord. 
Birth*27 September 1771 She was born on 27 September 1771 at Beekman, Dutchess County, New York.1 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Mary Mabie appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.2 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.3 
Marriage*22 July 1792 Mary Mabie married David Thomas Secord, son of Peter Secord and Abigail Fowler, on 22 July 1792 at Niagra, Lincoln County, Ontario, Canada.4 
(Witness) Immigration1793 Mary Mabie immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.5 
Death*circa April 1845 Mary Mabie died circa April 1845 at Southwold, Elgin County, Ontario, Canada.1 

Family

David Thomas Secord b. 6 Jan 1773, d. 27 Jun 1827
Children

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  3. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  4. [S430] Bible of Abigale Secord, says 22 Jul 1792.
  5. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.

Simon Mabee

M, #1330, b. 1776, d. 3 January 1843
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Info* Information on him came from Mary Edith Ward, #142. Long Point Settlers Journal (LPSJ), by R.Robert Mutrie, #23. Much more information is given by Mr Mutrie in the LPSJ. to early Maybee Society records. 
Name Variation  Simon Mabee was also known as Rev. of Baptist Church.2 
Birth*1776 He was born in 1776 at Rombout Precinct, Dutchess County, New York.3 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Simon Mabee appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.4 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.5 
(Witness) Immigration1793 Simon Mabee immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.6 
Marriage*1799 Simon Mabee married Abigail Gustin, daughter of John Gustin and Abigail Smith, in 1799 at Turkey Point, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.2,5 
(Witness) Probate1801 Simon Mabee was mentioned when William Benjamin Hilton's will was probated in 1801 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. "William Benjamin Hilton, husband of Levinah Mabee Hilton, died intestate. Sureties included Oliver Mabee and Simon Mabee, both of Charlottesville."7 
Occupation* Simon Mabee possessed a religious nature. He was emotional, warm-hearted and sympathetic; and early in life gave himself up to the work of preaching the gospel. Among the early pioneer preachers who visited the little settlements throughout old London District, no man was better known or more highly respected than Simon Mabee.5 
(Witness) Marriage24 February 1805 Simon Mabee witnessed the marriage of Caleb Burdick and Lovinia Teeple on 24 February 1805 at London District, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada; Caleb Burdick of Oxford and Levinah Teeple of Charlotteville, by John Beamer, J.P. Witnesses: Simon Mabee, Abigail Mabee and Silas Montross.8 
Anecdote13 September 1806 Sept 13, 1806 at Charlotteville in the District of London; Simon Mabee is a witness in the case of the King vs. Lot Tisdale, Ephraim Tisdale, Alexander Hutchinson, Joseph Milller and Henry Bostwick for assault.9 
Anecdote*July 1808 Piper's Corners: Joel Piper, a United Empire Loyalist from Massachusetts, came with Thomas Ingersoll's party of settlers to Oxford upon the Thames in 1793. He settled on lot 12, Conc 2, one mile south of the Old Stage Road on the east side of the North and South trail. The community which developed here was named after him. On Tremaine's map of 1857, there are Pipers on three of the four corners. The Mabee family occupied the southwest corner, Lot 13, Con 2, as they had ever since Simon Mabee, a fellow U.E.L. from Massachusetts, had arrived from Norfolk County, in the early 1800's. Mr. Simon Mabee played a vital role in the development of Piper's Corners. It was on the north east section of his property that the First Baptist Church in Oxford was established, and the Piper's School was built. Towards the south end of his farm, he constructed a dam and pond, and built a grist mill for the early farmers. The impressive stone house that he erected with the date 1808 inscribed above the doorway is still standing, and is now (late1970's) occupied by its present owners, Mr. and Mrs. Murray Budd. The Piper's Corners Baptist Church was the First Baptist church in Oxford County. In July 1808 Peter Teeple, Simon Mabee, Zachariah Burtch, Deborah Sales, Abigail Burtch and Elizabeth Scott met at the home of Peter Teeple to come under each other's watch-care. In 1809 they organized the Church. Meetings were held in the homes of the members. In Februry 1841, Elder Mabee offered 1 ½ acres on the northeast corner of his farm for a church and cemetery. It was located just south of the school with the cemetery at the rear of the church and school. This cemetery became neglected and a new owner of the farm allowed his cattle to pasture there. The markers, which were numerous, were broken and the farmer gathered them up and put them in the fence corner near the cemetery around 1890 to 1900. They remained there for some years, then these tombstones were made into a nice smooth marble walk from the house to the barn.
Simon Mabee built the Grist mill to serve the settlers. This mill continued in operation for many years. Mr. Ernest Mabee a great-grandson told Miss Hattie Mabee of Ingersoll, about its operation.

In 1834 the first log school was erected a mile south of Piper's Corners. The Second school was built in 1856 on land was obtained from Walter Bishop Mabee, the son of the pioneer Simon Mabee.10 
Occupation Simon Mabee was a High Constable at Walsingham Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.11 
Religion*30 March 1824 The Regular Baptist Church was organized March 30, 1824, under the ministration of Rev. Simon Mabee. The original membership was eleven in number. Elder Mabee remained pastor of the church till 1828. The church worships in a neat stone meeting house in the village of St. George. The main building is 40 feet by 60. The vestry room is 24 feet by 30.
St. George is a post village in the Township of South Dumfries, situated about a mile north of the line of the Great Western Railway, the nearest station being Harrisburg. It is distant 8 miles from Brantford, the same distance from Galt and Paris. There is considerable business done at St. George, situated as it is in a fine agricultural section of the country it contains three churches, viz: - the Canada Presbyterian, the Wesleyan Methodist and Baptist.12 
(Minister) Marriage25 February 1836 He officiated at the marriage of Oliver Dennis Mabee and Samantha Barber on 25 February 1836 at London District, Ontario, Canada; Oliver Mabee and Samantha Barber, of Townsend, Banns. Witnesses: Walter B. Mabee and Philander King. Reverend Simeon Mabee, Baptist church.13 
(Minister) Marriage17 July 1836 Simon Mabee officiated at the marriage of Jacob McMichael and Lavinia (?) on 17 July 1836 at London District, Ontario, Canada; Jacob McMichel and Lovenah Mabee, of Townsend, License. Witnesses: Walter B. Mabee and Ely Sage. Reverend Simeon Mabee, Baptist church.13 
Death*3 January 1843 Simon Mabee died on 3 January 1843 at West Oxford Township, Oxford County, Ontario, Canada; said to be aged 88 years.2 
Burial* He was buried at Ingersoll Rural Cemetery, Ingersoll, Oxford County, Ontario, Canada. Inscription "Rev Simon Mabee Died Jan 3, 1843 aged 76 years; Abigale Gustin wife of the above died June 17, 1871 aged 86 years."2,14 

Family

Abigail Gustin b. Dec 1784, d. 17 Jun 1871
Children

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S151] Tom Hoot, "Gustin reasearchers about Simeon Mabee," e-mail to John MayBee, 23 Feb 2001.
  3. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.
  4. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  5. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  6. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  7. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  8. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, Early London District marriages.
  9. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, from Highlights of the Court of Oyer and Terminer of Ontario 1792 - 1809; by Linda Corupe.
  10. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar.
  11. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899 "On the 8th of April, 1800, when the first session of Court was held that day, "District of London" was convened at Fort Munroe. Simon Mabee was sworn in open court as High Constable for Walsingham."
  12. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, Gazetter & Directory 1869-70 Brant County.
  13. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, District Marriage Registers of Upper Canada, London District, pt. 1, 1795-1841.
  14. [S382] Find A Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave Memorial# 45417236.

Oliver Mabee

M, #1331, b. 10 January 1774, d. 2 July 1854
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Note*  Scanned picture available from the Maybee Society courtesy of Dr Joseph de Beauchamp, MS 363. 
Birth*10 January 1774 Oliver Mabee was born on 10 January 1774 at Fishkill, Dutchess County, New York.2 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Oliver Mabee appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.3 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.4 
(Witness) Immigration1793 Oliver Mabee immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.5 
Marriage*7 June 1795 Oliver Mabee married Mary Smith, daughter of Abraham Smith and Abigail (?), on 7 June 1795 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.6 
(Witness) Probate1801 Oliver Mabee was mentioned when William Benjamin Hilton's will was probated in 1801 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. "William Benjamin Hilton, husband of Levinah Mabee Hilton, died intestate. Sureties included Oliver Mabee and Simon Mabee, both of Charlottesville."7 
Occupation*1 June 1805 Oliver Mabee was a served one year as High Constable on 1 June 1805 at District of London, Ontario, Canada.8 
MilService*1812  In 1812 Oliver Mabee was in the military, Oliver was captain of a company of militia and took part in the battle of Lundy's Lane.8 
(Witness) MilService1812 He was in the military with Henry Procunier, During the War of 1812, Henry was recorded as a private on an 1814 muster roll of Captain Oliver Mabee's Company of the Norfolk Militia in 1812 at Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.9 
(Witness) Will3 April 1823 Oliver Mabee was mentioned in the will of Lavinia Pelham on 3 April 1823 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. "Will of Levinah Hilton, of Charlottesville, dated 3/4/1823, mentions sons Pellum Mabee, Oliver Mabee, son-in-law John Stone, grandson William Stone, Gabriel Mabee, and other sons and daughters, but not identified."7 
Anecdote*1825 Oliver drove to Niagara [from Vittoria] on one occasion with a load of truck, consisting of pork, veal, butter, eggs and various other things. At this time Niagara was a larger town than York (Toronto), and Hamilton did not exist. When Mr. Mabee arrived with his produce the "powers that were" in old Niagara would not permit him to sell roll-butter inside the town limits. In order to dispose of it he carried it outside, where he employed a woman to work it all up in pound patties. This was in 1825, a time noted for scarcity of money in the settlement.8 
Marriage*4 March 1844 Oliver Mabee married Rachel Shearer on 4 March 1844 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.
"Oliver Maybee Sr. and Rachel Shearer, both of Charlotteville, License. Witnesses: Joseph Kitchen and Peter Mabee."10 
Religion*  Oliver Mabee was Became a Baptist "Deacon." 
(Witness) Census1851 Oliver Mabee appeared on the census of 1851 in the household of Oliver Pitt Mabee and Mary Laur at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada,
; 9, Oliver P. Mabee, M, 30, M, Farmer Canada, Baptist
10, Mary Mabee, F, 29, M, Canada, Quaker
11, George H. Mabee, M, 6, S, Canada, Quaker, attended school
12, Peter L. Mabee, M, 4, S, Canada, Quaker
13, Sarah E. Mabee, F, 1, S, Canada, Quaker
14, Peter Mabee, M, 22, S, Laborer, Canada, Baptist
15, William Mabee, M, 20, S, Laborer, Canada, Baptist
16, Eliza Mabee, F, 18, S, Canada, Baptist
17, Frederick Mabee, M, 16, S, Laborer, Canada, Baptist
18, John Moore, M, 31, M, Miller, Canada, Quaker, resident of Maldhide, not member of family
19, Catherine Moore, F, 26, M, Canada, Quaker, resident of Maldhide, not member of family
20, Oliver Mabee Sr., M, 79, M, United States-Province of New York, Baptist
21, Rachel Mabee, F, 68, M, United States, Baptist
22, Siforra Wilson, F, 35, W, Canada, Baptist, not member of family
23, Abigal Mabee, F, 49, W, Canada, Baptist
24, Samuel Mabee, M, 13, S, Canada, Baptist, attended school
25, Albert Mabee, M, 10, S, Canada, Baptist, attended school
26, George Mabee, M, 8, S, Canada, Baptist, attended school
27, Rhoda Mabee, F, 6, S, Canada, Baptist
Three families resided in a one and a half story frame house
17, Oliver P Mabee , Con 5, Lot 17, total family acreage 200, 155 under cultivation in 1851, 94 under crops , 58 under pasture, 3 under gardens or orchards, an 45 under woods or wild.11 
Death*2 July 1854 Oliver Mabee died on 2 July 1854 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, at age 80.2 
Burial*1855 He was buried in 1855 at Baptist Cemetery, Vittoria, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.6 

Family 1

Mary Smith b. 30 Jul 1774, d. 5 Feb 1844
Children

Family 2

Rachel Shearer b. c 1784

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S357] Submission by Joseph Louis de Beauchamp, Maybee Society Member No. 363.
  3. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  4. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  5. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  6. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.
  7. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  8. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 62.
  9. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, http://members.core.com/~procunia/research.htm
  10. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, G. J. Ryerse's Marriage Register 16 Apr 1831 to 22 Nov 1857.
  11. [S416] 1851 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Canada West, ED 5, Page 67 and Agricultural Schedule, page 119.

Ann Mabee

F, #1332, b. 25 May 1772, d. 20 April 1854
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Info* Information on her came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Name Variation  Ann Mabee was also known as Nancy. 
Married Name Her married name was Stone. 
Birth*25 May 1772 She was born on 25 May 1772 at Westchester County, New York. 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.2 
(Witness) Immigration1793 She immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.3 
Anecdote* John was possibly born in Massachusetts in 1769. After the American Revolutionary war ended, John and his father left the American States and boarded ship for New Brunswick Canada, Settling in Prince William. Soon after marrying Nancy Mabee ca 1792, they joined her parents in their move to Upper Canada and were the first white settlers at Turkey Point, Norfolk Co. in 1793. He received a grant of land as a United Empire Loyalist, that being Lot 18 Con. I (Broken Front), Charlotteville Twp. on the North Shore of Lake Erie. 
Marriage*1793 Ann Mabee married John Stone II in 1793 at Prince William, New Brunswick, Canada.4 
Death*20 April 1854 Ann Mabee died on 20 April 1854 at Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, at age 81.5 

Family

John Stone II b. 1767, d. 1846
Child

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  3. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  4. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, According to William D. Reid in Loyalists in Ontario.
  5. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.

Lydia Mabee

F, #1333, b. 6 June 1770, d. 16 February 1845
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Info* Information on her came from R.W. Frei, #234; R.R. Mutrie, #23 to early Maybee Society records. 
Married Name Her married name was Teeple. 
Birth*6 June 1770 Lydia Mabee was born on 6 June 1770 at Dutchess County, New York, Bob Frei has her birth place as Dutchess Co; Bob Mutrie has it as Westchester Co., NY. 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Lydia Mabee appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.2 
Marriage*8 January 1785 Lydia Mabee married Peter Teeple on 8 January 1785 at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.3 
(Witness) Anecdote1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.4 
(Witness) Immigration1793 Lydia Mabee immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.5 
Land*1797  In 1797 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, Lydia Mabee and Peter Teeple They were the first settlers at Turkey Point. After the survey of 1797, he was granted lot 8, Broken Front, Charlotte Twp. on the northern shoreline of Lake Erie. He quickly rose to prominence in the district.6 
Religion*1804  In 1804 Lydia Mabee and Peter Teeple were Lydia and Peter were founding members of the first Baptist Church there in 1804. Peter was a trustee of the meeting house in 1807 at First Baptist Church, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.6 
Immigration*1814  In 1814 Lydia Mabee and Peter Teeple immigrated to Oxford County, Ontario, Canada.After the War of 1812-1814, the Teeples moved to Oxford County, Ontario where they received a Loyalist Land Grant.6 
Death*16 February 1845 Lydia Mabee died on 16 February 1845 at Oxford, Oxford County, Ontario, Canada, at age 74.6 

Family

Peter Teeple b. 14 Jul 1762, d. 28 Jul 1847
Children

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  3. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.
  4. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  5. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  6. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.

Elizabeth Mabee

F, #1334, b. 1769
FatherFrederick Mabee1 b. 1734/35, d. 1794
MotherLavinia Pelham1 b. 1740, d. a 1823
Info* Information on her came from 1994 IGI; Film 183591, page 1476, ord. 30818. to early Maybee Society records. 
Name Variation  Elizabeth Mabee was also known as Betsey. 
Birth*1769 She was born in 1769 at New York.2 
(Witness) Census10 July 1784 Elizabeth Mabee appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 in the household of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada,
; Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.3 
(Witness) Immigration1793 Elizabeth Mabee immigrated with Frederick Mabee and Lavinia Pelham in 1793 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.4 
BaptismLDS20 May 1941 Elizabeth Mabee was baptized (by proxy) on 20 May 1941. 

Citations

  1. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.
  2. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.
  3. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  4. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.

Lavinia Pelham

F, #1335, b. 1740, d. after 1823
FatherWilliam Pelham1 b. c 1714, d. 23 Jan 1761
Married Name Her married name was Hilton. 
Married Name Her married name was Mabee. 
Birth*1740 Lavinia Pelham was born in 1740 at New Rochelle, Westchester County L, New York.1 
Marriage*1765 She married Frederick Mabee, son of Simon Mabee and Marie Landrin, in 1765.2 
Census*10 July 1784 Lavinia Pelham and Frederick Mabee appeared on the census of 10 July 1784 at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour, Ontario, Canada.
Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour has an entry: Frederick Maybee, wife Levina, children above 10: Lydia, Elizabeth, Oliver, children under 10: Mary, Sarah, Simon, Frederick.3 
Anecdote*1792 The Mabee party, it is said, started for Upper Canada in the fall of 1792, but they wintered in Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They drove twelve cows, rode horses, and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness
Some members of the family claim that the settlement was made as early as 1791, while others say it was not made before 1794; but Mrs. Mabee and her family were living there in a comfortable log-house at the time of Governor Simcoe's visit in 1795. The grave of Frederick Mabee was there also, and a piece of ground known as the "Indian fields" had been cleared of its light growth of timber and cropped; all of which makes it appear quite reasonable that the family may have settled there, at least as early as 1793.
The Mabee party consisted of Frederick Mabee and wife; Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about nineteen; Simeon, the second son, aged about seventeen; Pellum, the youngest son, aged about twelve – at least, these were the ages of the sons at the time of the Governor's visit; two single daughters – Polly and Sally; and two married daughters – Nancy and Lydia, with their respective husbands – John Stone and Peter Teeple. It is said that Peter Secord, also, came with the Mabee family.4 
Immigration*1793  In 1793 Lavinia Pelham and Frederick Mabee immigrated with Oliver Mabee, Simon Mabee, Pelham Mabee, Mary Mabie, Elizabeth Mabee, Sarah Mabee, Ann Mabee, John Stone II, Lydia Mabee and Peter Teeple to Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.Frederick Mabee was a United Empire Loyalist, whose home had at the British evacuation of New York, been confiscated, and himself and family subjected to indignity by many of his former neighbours because he declined to swear allegiance to the "New Republic", holding as he no doubt conscientiously did, that the grievances of the colonists should be settled by constitutional means rather than by the sword. Having heard of the wonderful fertility and natural advantage of the Long Point (or as it was first called, the Turkey Point) country in Upper Canada from his cousin. Peter Secord, a U.E. Loyalist who had accompanied him to Saint John from New York and who, being an old hunter, had already penetrated the wilds of Upper Canada with one George Ramsay, and Englishman, on a hunting and exploring trip, he resolved to form a small colonization party to open a permanent party at Turkey Point. Gathering many of his relatives together, including his son-in-law, Capt. Teeple, the "Mabee Party" as they were afterwards called, set out in the fall of 1792, but they wintered at Quebec and did not reach Turkey Point until some time in 1793. They brought some household goods, drove several cows, rode horses and employed an Indian guide to pilot the way through the wilderness. The men drove the animals along the shore, the women came in boats, going ashore at night to camp. During the journey through the wilds they sustained themselves largely on cornmeal and milk from the cows.

The party consisted of Frederick Mabee and Lavinia (nee Pelham or Pellum), Oliver Mabee, their eldest son, aged about 19; Simon, the second son, aged 17; Pollum, the youngest son, aged about 5; three single daughters, Polly, Betsy and Sally, and two married daughters, Nancy, with her husband, John Stone and Lydia, with her husband, Capt. Peter Teeple, and their four children. His cousin, Peter Secord and Thomas Welch, also came with the Mabee party. Frederick Mabee at once erected the first log cabin ever built at the new settlement, at the foot of the hill overlooking Turkey Point. Their corn was pounded in the stump of a walnut tree, the beetle being attached to a "sweep" like the "Old Oaken Bucket".

One year after the arrival of the party he died of apoplexy, and was buried in a hollowed-out walnut log coffin. He was the first white man buried in the new settlement, and a large boulder marks his tomb near Turkey Point. His widow subsequently married Lieut. William B. Hilton, a New York Loyalist of the Kings American Dragoons, but he died three years after the marriage. Large numbers of other Loyalists poured into the settlement shortly after, but the "Mabee Party" came in advance of the rest and became "squatters" until the lands were apportioned by the Crown to all the Loyalists.

Polly and Sally Mabee, two daughters who came to Turkey Point, single, married respectively Capt. David Secord, of Butler's Rangers, and Silas Montross, both U.E. Loyalists. The former was a miller at Niagara, but later settled on Catfish creek, west of Orwell; the latter lived at Turkey Point. The Mabee, Teeple, Secord, Montross and Stone families became prominent factors in the early days of settlement, but now their descendants are very widely scattered.

More than a hundred years have come and gone since Frederick Mabee and his sons and sons-in-law made the acquaintance of the wild, painted and befeathered savages of the north shore of Lake Erie, and where they were surprised and startled by the bedlam of discordant sounds, which daily rent the air, from the throats of the myriads of wild turkeys, geese and duck, as these sturdy pioneers staked out their new homes at Turkey Point. Today their great grandsons are found in the ranks of busy men, scattered all over the American continent, and their great-great grandchildren occupy seats in nearly every school house in the land. In fact, these descendants have become so numerous, and so widely dispersed, that they meet as strangers, never dreaming that the old pioneer mother who pounded corn in the hollow of a walnut stump more than a hundred years ago, was their common maternal ancestor.5 
Marriage*1798 Lavinia Pelham married William Benjamin Hilton in 1798 at Turkey Point, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.5 
Will*3 April 1823 Lavinia Pelham left a will on 3 April 1823 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. "Will of Levinah Hilton, of Charlottesville, dated 3/4/1823, mentions sons Pellum Mabee, Oliver Mabee, son-in-law John Stone, grandson William Stone, Gabriel Mabee, and other sons and daughters, but not identified."6 
Death*after 1823 She died after 1823. 

Family 1

Frederick Mabee b. 1734/35, d. 1794
Children

Family 2

William Benjamin Hilton b. s 1750, d. 28 Sep 1801

Citations

  1. [S357] Submission by Joseph Louis de Beauchamp, Maybee Society Member No. 363.
  2. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.
  3. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, "Roll of Loyalists Settled at Belle Hill in Beaver Harbour - 10th July, 1784."
  4. [S299] E. A. Owen, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement, Sketch 5.
  5. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, A sketch by W.B. Waterbury, published in the Southern Counties Journal, St. Thomas, in 1899,.
  6. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…
  7. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.

Frederick Manuel

M, #1337, b. 1788, d. 1812
FatherAnthony Manuel b. c 1758, d. 3 Dec 1816
MotherMargaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Info* Information on him came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*1788 Frederick Manuel was born in 1788 at New Brunswick, Canada.1 
Death*1812 He died in 1812; lived in the Niagra area. 

Citations

  1. [S1] Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees, Napiorski-Carde-Nowak.

Ida Madeline Caley Woodward

F, #1338, b. 27 January 1902, d. 1997
FatherCharles Hallum Woodward1 b. 28 Dec 1877, d. 21 Feb 1927
MotherMinnie Alice Caley1 b. 25 Dec 1881, d. 4 Feb 1902
Info* Information on her came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Married Name Her married name was Mutrie. 
Birth*27 January 1902 Ida Madeline Caley Woodward was born on 27 January 1902 at South Walsingham, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.1 
Marriage*3 August 1925 She married George Whitlaw Mutrie on 3 August 1925 at Saint Williams, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.2 
Death*1997 Ida Madeline Caley Woodward died in 1997. 

Family

George Whitlaw Mutrie b. 1 Sep 1898, d. 1979

Citations

  1. [S1] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1909.
  2. [S1] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada, Marriages, 1801-1928, 1933-1934.

Simon Griffin

M, #1339, b. say 1750, d. before 1784
Note*  R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research." 
Birth*say 1750 Simon Griffin was born say 1750. 
Marriage* He married Margaret Mabee, daughter of Simon Mabee and second wife
(Witness) Memo Simon Griffin witnessed Margaret Mabee She was a Loyalist and widow when she went with her father and siblings to New York City and then on to New Brunswick residing at Prince William. at Prince William, New Brunswick, Canada.1 
Death*before 1784 Simon Griffin died before 1784. 

Family

Margaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Children

Citations

  1. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.

Polly Griffin

F, #1340, b. say 1775
FatherSimon Griffin b. s 1750, d. b 1784
MotherMargaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Info* Information on her came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*say 1775 Polly Griffin was born say 1775. 

Jacob Cope

M, #1341, b. say 1790
Info* Information on him came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*say 1790 Jacob Cope was born say 1790. 
Marriage*17 January 1837 He married Leah Manuel, daughter of Anthony Manuel and Margaret Mabee, on 17 January 1837 at Saint Williams, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. 

Family

Leah Manuel b. 15 Apr 1790, d. 17 Nov 1871

Anthony Manuel

M, #1342, b. circa 1758, d. 3 December 1816
Info* Information on him came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*circa 1758 Anthony Manuel was born circa 1758 at Portugal.1 
Marriage* He married Margaret Mabee, daughter of Simon Mabee and second wife
Note*circa 1807  After her marriage to Anthony Manuel they continued to live at Prince William until abt. 1807 when they moved to Normandale, Charlotte Twp.,NorfolkCo., Ontario, Canada. They kept a boarding house for the workers at Van Norman Ironworks there circa 1807 at Normandale, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.2 
Death*3 December 1816 Anthony Manuel died on 3 December 1816 at Hamilton Township, Northumberland County, Ontario, Canada.3 
Burial* He was buried at Johnson Cemetery, Saint Williams, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. 

Family

Margaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Ancestry.com, Public Member Trees, Napiorski-Carde-Nowak.
  2. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.
  3. [S382] Find A Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave Memorial# 163554684.

John Griffin

M, #1343, b. say 1775
FatherSimon Griffin b. s 1750, d. b 1784
MotherMargaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Info* Information on him came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*say 1775 John Griffin was born say 1775. 

Nancy Ann Manuel

F, #1344, b. 11 April 1784, d. 2 July 1883
FatherAnthony Manuel1 b. c 1758, d. 3 Dec 1816
MotherMargaret Mabee1 b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Married Name Her married name was Willis.2 
Birth*11 April 1784 Nancy Ann Manuel was born on 11 April 1784 at Mispec, Saint John County, New Brunswick, Canada.1,2 
Marriage* She married Henry Willis.2 
Death*2 July 1883 Nancy Ann Manuel died on 2 July 1883 at Houghton Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, at age 99.2 
Burial* She and Henry Willis were buried at Clear Creek/ Burger Cemetery, Houghton Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.2 

Family

Henry Willis b. 1784, d. 8 Feb 1858

Citations

  1. [S9] R. Robert Mutrie, 6,000 New York Ancestors.
  2. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar.

Edward Griffin

M, #1345, b. say 1775
FatherSimon Griffin b. s 1750, d. b 1784
MotherMargaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Info* Information on him came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*say 1775 Edward Griffin was born say 1775. 

Sanders Griffin

M, #1346, b. say 1775
FatherSimon Griffin b. s 1750, d. b 1784
MotherMargaret Mabee b. 29 Jan 1752 or 31 Jan 1757, d. 5 Sep 1841 or 5 Sep 1846
Info* Information on him came from R.R. Mutrie "6,000 NY Ancestors - A compendium of Mabie Research" to early Maybee Society records. 
Birth*say 1775 Sanders Griffin was born say 1775. 

Gullaume Landrin

M, #1347, b. circa 1666
Name Variation  Gullaume Landrin was also known as William.1 
Birth*circa 1666 He was born circa 1666.2 
Marriage* He married Marie Sicard, daughter of Ambroise Sicard.3 

Family

Marie Sicard b. 1676/77
Child

Citations

  1. [S227] Norman Davis, Westchester Patriarchs.
  2. [S227] Norman Davis, Westchester Patriarchs, age 32 in 1698.
  3. [S297] GEDCOM from William Joseph Thurlow on unknown family info line.

Portia Mabie Vandenburgh1

F, #1348, b. 8 October 1922, d. 6 August 2006
FatherEarl Peter Vandenburgh1 b. 9 Mar 1892, d. 3 Sep 1967
MotherMildred Esther Mabie1 b. 18 May 1898, d. 31 May 1984
Married Name Her married name was Price.2 
Birth*8 October 1922 Portia Mabie Vandenburgh was born on 8 October 1922 at Los Angeles County, California.1 
Death*6 August 2006 She died on 6 August 2006 at Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County, California, at age 83.3 

Citations

  1. [S1] Ancestry.com, California Birth Index, 1905-1995.
  2. [S382] Find A Grave, online http://www.findagrave.com/, Find A Grave Memorial# 64093656.
  3. [S2] Social SecurityDeath Index, online http://ssdi.genealogy.rootsweb.com/

Margaret Mabee

F, #1349, b. between 1834 and 1835, d. 17 January 1872
FatherPelham Mabee b. 19 Jan 1787, d. 7 Feb 1861
MotherMary Layman b. bt 1790 - 1791, d. 10 Apr 1868
Married Name Her married name was Cartwright.1 
Birth*between 1834 and 1835 Margaret Mabee was born between 1834 and 1835 at Ontario, Canada.2 
(Witness) Census1851 Margaret Mabee appeared on the census of 1851 in the household of George Mabee at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada,
; 22, George Mabee, M, 34, S, Farmer, Canada, Baptist
23, Margaret Mabee, F, 17, S, Canada, Baptist
24, Pelham Mabee, M, 24, S, Canada, Farmer, Baptist
25, Mary Mabee, F, 6, S, Canada, Baptist
Resided in a one story frame house
23, George Mabee, Front range, part of lot 9, total family acreage 37, 32 under cultivation in 1851, 20 under crops , 7 under pasture, 3 under gardens or orchards, and 5 under woods or wild
24, Pelham Mabee, Front range, part of lot 9, total family acreage 130, 14 under cultivation in 1851, 10 under crops , 4 under gardens or orchards, and 114 under woods or wild.3 
Marriage*4 July 1853 Margaret Mabee married Warren Cartwright on 4 July 1853 at Ontario, Canada.
"Warren Cartwright and Margaret Mabee of Charlotteville. Witnesses: Landrine Maybee; Sarah Ryerse."4 
Death*17 January 1872 Margaret Mabee died on 17 January 1872.5 

Family

Warren Cartwright b. s 1830

Citations

  1. [S11] Data from the Maybee Society Card File, Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement.
  2. [S153] Norfolk County Genealogy Website, online http://www.norfolkgenealogy.com/, 1852 census, page 11.
  3. [S416] 1851 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Canada West, ED 5, Page 11 and Agricultural Schedule, Page 113.
  4. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, G. J. Ryerse's Marriage Register 16 Apr 1831 to 22 Nov 1857.
  5. [S10] Royal A Mabee's notebook.

Elizabeth Ann Mabee

F, #1350, b. 12 April 1832, d. 31 May 1915
FatherPelham Mabee b. 19 Jan 1787, d. 7 Feb 1861
MotherMary Layman b. bt 1790 - 1791, d. 10 Apr 1868
Married Name Her married name was Crockett.1 
Birth*12 April 1832 Elizabeth Ann Mabee was born on 12 April 1832 at Port Rowan, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada. 
Marriage*25 December 1850 She married James Crockett on 25 December 1850 at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.
"James Crockett and Elizabeth Maybee of Charlotteville, Banns . Witnesses: Landrine Maybee; Matthias Jackson."2 
(Witness) Census1851 Elizabeth Ann Mabee appeared on the census of 1851 in the household of Pelham Mabee and Mary Layman at Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada,
; 10, Pelham Mabee, M, 65, M, New Brunswick, Methodist
11, Mary Mabee, F, 61, M, United States, Baptist
12, Drusilla Mabee, F, 32, S, Canada, nothing
13, Elizabeth Crocket, F, 19, M, Canada, Baptist, baby girl born and died at 2 days in 1851
14, Susan Mabee, F, 3, S, Canada, Baptist
15, Mary Ann Mabee, F, 6, S, Canada, Baptist
16, Jacob Barnhart, M, 53, W, Labourer, Canada, Christian, not family member
Resided in a one story frame house
19, Pelham Mabee , Range A, Lot 10, no land or crops described.3 
Census*1901 Elizabeth Ann Mabee and James Crockett appeared on the census of 1901 at Port Rowan, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.
45 Crockett James M Head M Apr 14 1820 80 Sailor Emg. US 1844
46 Crockett Elizabeth F Wife M Apr 12 1832 68
47 Crockett Harry M Son S Jun 20 1870 30
48 Crockett Cruso M Son S Mar 4 1865 36
49 Nielson Elizabeth F Great Niece S Nov 15 1884 16.4 
(Witness) oObit6 January 1909 Elizabeth Ann Mabee was mentioned in the obituary of James Crockett on 6 January 1909 at Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada; The Late Capt. James Crockett. On Tuesday evening last week, Mr. James Crockett died at his residence on Wolvin Street, Port Rowan, after an illness of 2 months. He was born on the 17th of April, 1820, in Ireland. He left his home at the age of 11 years and went to sea. He was a sailor for a number of years on fresh and salt waters. He left the sailing business and was in the fishery for a number of years. He has been around this region for 63 years. .58 years Christmas, he married Miss Mabee, daughter of Pellam Mabee, an old pioneer of Turkey Point. He was a resident of Port Rowan for 25 years, and was known and respected by all. Besides his widow, he leaves five sons, Joseph, Criso and Harry, at Port Rowan, and two in Buffalo, Samuel and William, and one daughter, Mrs. John Sherk, of Simcoe; one daughter, Emma, Mrs. Paterson, and one son, James, predeceased him. He had 22 grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren, a host of friends also deeply regret his departure, especially the older men of the community, who have regarded him as their companion and friend -- one of the chief repositories of the memories and traditions of the community.5 
Death*31 May 1915 Elizabeth Ann Mabee died on 31 May 1915 at Port Rowan, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada, at age 83.6 
Burial* She was buried at Bayview Cemetery, Port Rowan, Norfolk County, Ontario, Canada.6 

Family

James Crockett b. 17 Apr 1820, d. 29 Dec 1908
Children

Citations

  1. [S11] Data from the Maybee Society Card File, Ontario Register, p 175. Pioneer Sketches of Long Point Settlement.
  2. [S16] Steve Mabie, Chronology of Ontario Canada, online http://maybeesociety.org/steve/canada/…, G. J. Ryerse's Marriage Register 16 Apr 1831 to 22 Nov 1857.
  3. [S416] 1851 Canadian Census, online ancestry.com, Charlotteville Township, Norfolk County, Canada West, ED 5, Page 11 and Agricultural Schedule, Page 127.
  4. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, 1901 Census of Canada, Ontario, Norfolk (South/Sud) (#94), Subdistrict: Port Rowan (Village) D, Page 9, Family 113, Schedule 1 Microfilm T-6485.
  5. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, from newspaper 6 Jan 1909 British Canadian.
  6. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, e-mail address.
  7. [S241] Emails from Barbara Millar, e-mail address.